Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

1
Trionfo de Sogni 1566
-------------------------
This is intended to collect some material to the Trionfo de Sogni (Triumph of dreams) for a marriage in 1565/66 in Florence.
The central star is the Demogorgon, something like a Demiurg or a God-generation-monster.

Image



http://books.google.com/books?id=yVnuNJNJ7icC&pg=PA22

Description of Vasari
http://books.google.com/books?id=dVS_w6 ... ni&f=false
2nd appearance
http://books.google.com/books?id=dVS_w6sTe0EC&pg=PA281

Seznec
http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/pr ... _52_1_7262
(with some pictures)

Arts of power: three halls of state in Italy, 1300-1600
By Randolph Starn, Loren W. Partridge
http://books.google.com/books?id=mTHGD-WIkIcC&pg=PA345

Vincenzo Borghini (Organizer)
http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincenzo_Borghini

Demogorgon
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demogorgon
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

2
Boiardo, Orlando Innamorato, II,13

Sopra ogni fata è quel Demogorgone
(Non so se mai lo odisti racontare),
E iudica tra loro e fa ragione,
E quello piace a lui, può di lor fare.
La notte se cavalca ad un montone,
Travarca le montagne e passa il mare,
E strigie e fate e fantasime vane
Batte con serpi vive ogni dimane.


Demogorgon rules all fairies
(I wonder if you ever heard this)
he judges among them and reasons with them,
he does of them whatever he wants.
At night he rides a ram,
he climbs the mountains and crosses the sea,
every day he beats with live snakes
witches, fairies and vain ghosts.

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

3
Hi friends
Demogorgon is an invention of Boccaccio, probably as a rendition of "demiurge" of Plato. I've written about this in Spanish. With the Google translator:

Boccaccio and Demogorgon

In this context, between 1350 and 1370, the Florentine writer Giovanni Boccaccio wrote a treatise entitled De monumental mythological genealogy gentilium deorum in Spanish, Genealogy of the Gentile gods, the latter term is sometimes replaced by "pagan" 1.

From available sources, Homer, Apollodorus, Virgil, Cicero, Ovid, Macrobius, etc.-fifteen books Boccaccio addressed in classical myths from pedigrees. In the first book about the lineage of one Demogorgon, the first god of all, which consider the following:

"[...] Those who claimed that the Earth was the creator of all things, says Teodoncio, which had within it a divine mind, they called Demogorgon. When I actually think the father and the beginning of the pagan gods, as I discovered, as poetic fictions it has had no father and because I read that this was not only father of Ether, but grandfather, and other many gods from which they were born, of whom mention was made earlier.

"So, taken all separated some as superfluous heads and taken to the members, after thinking have found the beginning of the road making Demogorgon not the father of things but of the pagan gods with God's help we will enter the rough way through the Etna Taenarum or descending into the bowels of the earth and furrowing before other fords of the lake Styx.

"Described with great majesty the tree of darkness, to me, who was wandering through the bowels of the earth, he appeared the inactive ancestor of all the pagan gods, surrounded on all sides of clouds and shadow, Demogorgon, horrible by the same name, covered with a certain pallor and a careless mossy moisture and foul exhaling a repulsive smell of earth and the father of the unfortunate confession source more foreign words than with his own, stood before me, the creator of the new work.

"I laughed, I confess, seeing, remembering the folly of the ancients, who thought that nobody was born eternal father of all things and hiding in the bowels of the earth. Since this really relates little to the work, let him in his misery, moving us toward what we want. For Teodoncio says the cause of this foolish credulity has its origin in men of science but rather on the former farmers of Arcadia. These, being landsmen, and savage and untamed as they saw the land, by its own momentum, producing all types of forests and bushes, making spring flowers, fruits and seeds, which fed all the animals and finally received in anything herself dying and, further, that the mountains belched flames, the fire tore the hard silica, that winds blew from concave areas and valleys and realized that she, the earth moving ever roars and even issued its own entrails poured fountains, lakes and rivers, as if from her ethereal fire and the air pure and fully saturated, poured this vast expanse of ocean water, and like as if tiny sparks that they flew to the top from the shock of the fire balloons produjesen sun and moon and stars and everlasting nailed haphazardly on top of the sky, he foolishly believed him.

"But those who followed after them, thinking they had something more profound, not just to the land called the author of these things, but had implicit in it a divine mind whose thought and will be producing things. And they thought that the mind had its home in underground places.

"Increased credibility in the error between the peasants have gone very deep in the caverns and recesses of the earth once, because in them, to move forward with an increasingly dim light, it seems that silence is enlarged, superstition became accustomed to penetrate the minds with the natural horror of the places and the suspected presence of some unknown divinity, divinity conjectured as such by them, did not consider another Demogorgon, by the fact that he believed his house was in the bowels of the earth, as has been said.

"So this, to be held among the oldest Arcadian high honor, considering that it increased the majesty of his divinity remained silent her name, or thinking it was decent so high that a man ran from mouth to mouth among mortals, perhaps fearing that when he was appointed was angry with them, was forbidden, with popular consent, which was named by someone with no punishment. What certainly seems to attest Ericto Lucan when he describes invoking the Manes said [VI, 744-747] "obey or to be called one who, when invoked, the earth trembles without ever being shaken, the openly looking Gorgona and punishing Erinys fearing his blows, and so on. "

"This is how Estacio, when the old order of blind Teiresias Eteocles searches the outcome of the war of the Thebans says [IV, 514-517]:" For we know it and you fear that something is said and known and disturbing Hecate if I Timbreo, do not be afraid of you and the world's largest triple that is harmful to know, to him, but corn, etc. ". This, of which the two poets speak not its name implies, clearly says Lactantius, famous and learned man, who says Statius, which is Demogorgon, the most important and the first of the pagan gods.

"And we can even accept it if they want to give value to the words of poems. For in Lucan says the woman witch [Ericto] and pagan, to show his prominence and his mansion underground, the earth trembles when invoked it, something he never does on other occasions not to be shaken. Following this he says that because he sees the Gorgon, this is the bare earth, ie in its fullness, because it inhabits the bowels of the earth, and we on our part towards him, only see the top surface. Or openly contemplates Gorgon, the monster turns to stone those who watch, and therefore turns to stone, so that it appears as a further sign of its preeminence.

"Thirdly, it also shows his power in the Underworld to say that this Erinys whipping instead of Furies, this is the Furies, that is repressed and angry with his power.

"Moreover, Estacio says this is known as the celestial gods, so that shows that it is underground and the first of all and invoked can crush the" Manes to the wishes of mortals, which they would not want. He also says that is harmful to know, because knowing the secrets of a god is not concerned at all, for if known, the power of divinity became a trifle.

"To him [a Demogorgon] Furthermore, so as not to distress in the tedium of solitude, the old generous and all-seeing, says Teodoncio gave as companions to Eternity and Chaos, and then a large battalion of children, for them between males and females claimed to have been nine, as shown later in detail.

"This was the place of revelation if there was something hidden under a poetic fiction. But, as it is to discover the meaning of this divinity wrong, so it only remains to explain what seems to signify his harsh name. Demogorgon Greek for Latin, I think, earth god. For demon is a god, says Leoncio, but Gorgon is interpreted as land. Or better yet, the wisdom of the earth, as it is presented as the god who knows or wisdom. Or, as more pleasing to others, a terrible god, which is read from the true God who dwells in heaven, His holy and terrible name. But this is terrible for other reasons, for one, for the rectitude of his justice is terrible in his trial for those who do evil, it instead to those who think foolishly. "

But who is Demogorgon?

Boccaccio's mythological treatise was popular during the Renaissance. Served as a reference for many artists and writers and described by Boccaccio Demogorgon a primal earth god, fierce and terrible, the father of all other gods, was taken up by other authors. Thus, for example, is mentioned by Leo the Hebrew in one of his Dialogues of Love, in Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, in the seven books of Jorge de Montemayor Diana or three hundred of Juan de Mena. Even today there is a character in an RPG called Demogorgon.

Now, the puzzling thing is that neither Homer nor Hesiod and Apollodorus and Ovid, or any other relevant mythographer Antiquity mentions a Demogorgon by either side. Where Boccaccio then deduced the existence of God?

In 1930, a professor of Latin literature at the University of Palermo called Carlo Landi addressed this issue in an essay entitled delicious Demogorgon (Remo Sandron. Palermo, 1930) 2. According to Landi, Boccaccio managed three main sources to describe the god Demogorgon and their children. The first and most important was a treaty of such a mythological Teodoncio (Theodontius) whose existence is still being questioned.

With arguments, Landi says Teodoncio did exist, it was a Byzantine author who lived in the eighth century and wrote a treatise in Latin mythological Boccaccio was available, although not preserved today. In addition, suspects, to narrate the role of Demogorgon in the creation of the universe, Teodoncio was inspired by the triad of Zas - Chronos - pre-Socratic philosopher Chthonios Pherecydes of Syros.

The second source would be a poem entitled Byzantine Pronapide Protocosmos of one of Athens, Landi think it could have been written by the Tedoncio:

"Io che congetturare ardirei is non fu stesso own Teodonzio to invent it healthy di quel pianta poemetto tale, if di Pronapide dell'autorità Serviss" poet "{g d. l 3, 1. 5) to coonestare i suoi trovati ingegnosi press'a bit che nel so l'Ariosto e gli altri cavallereschi Poemi authorities if giovarono di di dell'autorità Turpin. "

And the third source is a passage from Lactantius Placidus comment to the Thebaid of Estacio3 (IV, 516), which speaks of a god who created the cosmos, which perhaps could have been the source of inspiration to Teodoncio to choose the Demogorgón4 name. And most interesting is that in the various codices where the comment has been preserved, the name of God appears differently: demoirgon, emoirgon, Demogorgon acme, Demogorgon, demogelgunta, demogerontem and so on.

This, as you have warned the reader familiar with the classical world, to suspect that the term Demogorgon might be some corruption Byzantine much more familiar word in antiquity: the "Demiurge", a divine entity who popularized by Plato in the fourth century BC and was used by many authors and sects to denote the creator god of the universe, either the beginning, whether an intermediary between transcendent forces and material reality, as they thought the Valentinians.

Thus, we suspect that some text Boccaccio Teodoncio collected, which in turn inspired a classic tradition of the Demiurge was the creator of the universe and, more specifically, given the following references to Eternity Boccaccio and other concepts similar to a Neoplatonic tradition and, perhaps, Gnostic, subject the latter to leave for another day.
When a man has a theory // Can’t keep his mind on nothing else (By Ross)

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

4
Thanks Marco,

... :-) ... nice, that you returned to some Tarocchi activity.

Boccaccio was from Florence and likely this explains at least to a part, why the mentioned Demorgone show took place in Florence.

I've recently worked about Boccaccio and his Decamerone. There's something very specific in Boccaccio's handling of the virtue "Prudentia", which might have influenced the "hide-the-Prudentia" element in the Tarocchi development.

http://tarotforum.net/showthread.php?t=163397

Chess is also involved in this topic.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

5
Doctor Faustus (scene 3) by Christopher Marlowe, 1604

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4DXV8OTUEk&t=11m19s
Marlowe wrote: Within this circle is Jehovah’s name,
Forward and backward anagrammatis’d
The breviated names of holy saints,
Figures of every adjunct to the Heavens,
And characters of signs and erring stars,
By which the spirits are enforc’d to rise:
Then fear not, Faustus, but be resolute,
And try the uttermost magic can perform.

Sint mihi Dei Acherontis propitii! Valeat numen triplex Jehovae! Ignei, aerii, aquatani spiritus, salvete! Orientis princeps Belzebub, inferni ardentis monarcha, et Demogorgon, propitiamus vos, ut appareat et surgat Mephistophilis.
Be propitious to me, gods of Acheron! Away with the spirit of the three fold Jehovah! Spirits of fire, air, water, hail! Belzebub, Prince of the East, monarch of burning hell, and Demogorgon, we propitiate ye, that Mephistophilis may appear and rise.

PS: Here is Baccio Baldini's description of the "Mascherata":
http://www.archive.org/stream/discorsosopralam00bald

PPS: Landi's essay quoted by Marcos:
http://www.archive.org/stream/MN40018ucmf_0

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

6
In classical Greek mythology, there is a difference between a gorgon and a demogorgon. There were three gorgons, sisters with snakes for hair, who had the power to turn people to stone by their gaze (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gorgon). "Demogorgon" however is not a term in classical mythology at all. Wikipedia says that the word doesn't occur until pseudo-Lactantius, 350-400 a.d., in a commentary on Statius:
...the author says of Statius, Dicit deum Demogorgona summum ('He is speaking of the Demogorgon, the supreme god', or perhaps 'He is speaking of a god, the supreme Demogorgon'). Prior to Lactantius, there is no mention of the supposed "Demogorgon" anywhere by any writer, pagan or Christian.
But the god would have been a "demiurge," the creator-god of Plato's Timaeus. In calling it a kind of gorgon, our commentator has made the god into a demon.

When Boccaccio cites Lucan for information about the demogorgon, he is following an early medieval continuation of this demonization. As Wikipedia says:
In the Early Middle Ages, Demogorgon is mentioned in the tenth-century Adnotationes super Lucanum, a series of short notes to Lucan's Pharsalia that are included in the Commenta Bernensia, the "Berne Scholia on Lucan".
But Lucan clearly specifies a gorgon, not a demogorgon (http://books.google.com/books?id=vH_XK5 ... &q&f=false).

And so it goes, through Boccaccio, Marlowe, Spenser, etc., a creature that is a cross between a demiurge and a gorgon, born of early commentators' prejudices or confusions, grown to maturity in medieval darkness, and by the glorious Renaissance propagating its kind throughout the European imagination.

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

7
Anonymous Description of the Trionfo de Sogni 1566
Anonymos: Descrizione del canto de sogni mandato dall'illustr.mo Principe di Fiorenza e di Siena, il secondo giorno de febbraio 1565 in Fiorenza
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k853340z/f7.item

The first page seems to present a sort of content of Trionfo de Sogni .... "Sogni" means "dreams"

Image


***********************

Hannah Yasmine Chegwin: Der Traum des Fürsten. Gemalte Träume in der italienischen Renaissance. Dissertation Saarbrücken 2020.
https://docplayer.org/214655684-Der-tra ... rsten.html
Page 175
Neben den Naturwissenschaften schien noch eine andere Thematik das besondere Interesse des Großherzogs von Florenz hervorzurufen: Der Traum. Dies kann mit dem im Zeitgeist liegenden und rege geführten Gelehrtendiskurs über den Traum (797) erklärt werden. Das noch im Mittelalter gemeinhin negativ konnotierte Sujet scheint einen prägenden Eindruck auf Francesco I. gemacht zu haben. Zu dessen Hochzeit 1566 ließ der Großherzog einen Triumphzug, den sogenannten Trionfo de’Sogni, von Vincenzo Borghini und Giovanni Battista Cini konzipieren, dessen Aufstellung durch Vasari überliefert ist. (798) Möglicherweise war der Großherzog selbst an der Konzeption des Umzuges, der am 2. Februar des Jahres 1566 durch die Straßen von Florenz führte, beteiligt. (799) Im vorderen Bereich des durch mehrere Darsteller inszenierten nächtlichen Zuges befanden sich Figuren, die die menschlichen Begierden symbolisierten, wie Liebe, Schönheit, Ruhm und Reichtum, und die als »trügerische Begierden wie Träume« (800) verstanden werden sollten. Der hintere Teil des Triumphzuges war dem Schlafgott mit seiner »sowohl göttliche[n] als auch menschliche[n] Natur« (801) gewidmet. Dieser letzte Wagen wurde von sechs Bären gezogen, deren Köpfe mit Mohnpflanzen geschmückt waren. Hierzu gehörte die personifizierte Stille, die von drei stattlichen, blau gekleideten Frauen begleitet wurde, welche als Zeichen der Ruhe jeweils eine Schildkröte auf dem Kopf trugen. Auf diesem sechseckigen Wagen war ein großer Elefantenkopf zu sehen, in welchem sich die Höhle des Schlafgottes befand, der von seinen Söhnen Morpheus, Icelus und Phantasos umgeben wurde. Oberhalb der Höhle wurde Alba, die Morgendämmerung, mit vom Tau nassem blondem Haar nachgestellt. Vor dem erdachten Haus des Schlafes war eine Personifikation der Nacht positioniert, die sich auf einen Dachs stützte und das Tier wohl als Polster nutzte. Unterhalb der Nacht befand sich ein auf einem Wildschweinkopf sitzender Satyr als orphisches Symbol des Traumes, der sowohl den Menschen als auch den Göttern als eigen angesehen wurde. Die verschiedenen Szenenabschnitte sind unter anderem von Hexen, nächtlichen Tieren, Satyrn und Mohngirlanden tragenden Putti separiert worden. Die Rückseite des Wagens zeigte eine Darstellung der mythologischen Begebenheit von Luna und Endymion. 802) Der geradezu petrarkistische Blick auf das Leben –ein Leben, das einem (kurzen) Traum ähnele (803), da »Reichtum, Schönheit, Krieg, Ruhm und sogar die Liebe [...] nichts als Phantasiegebilde [seien], denen der Mensch vergeblich nachjagt« (804) – trug zum großen Aufsehen des Zuges bei. 805)
Footnotes: at pages 175-176

Automatic translation
In addition to the natural sciences, another topic seemed to arouse the special interest of the Grand Duke of Florence: the dream. This can be explained by the scholarly discourse on dreams (797), which is in keeping with the spirit of the times and is actively conducted. The subject, which still had negative connotations in the Middle Ages, seems to have made a formative impression on Francesco I. At his wedding in 1566, the Grand Duke ordered a triumphal procession, the so-called Trionfo de'Sogni, by Vincenzo Borghini and Giovanni Battista Cini conceive, the installation of which has been handed down by Vasari. (798) It is possible that the Grand Duke himself was involved in the conception of the parade that took place on February 2nd, 1566 through the streets of Florence. (799) In the front area of the nocturnal procession staged by several actors there were figures that symbolized human desires such as love, beauty, fame and fortune, and were to be understood as "deceptive desires like dreams" (800). The rear part of the triumphal procession was dedicated to the god of sleep with his "nature both divine and human" (801). This last chariot was drawn by six bears whose heads were decorated with poppies. This included the personification of silence, which was accompanied by three stately women dressed in blue, each with a tortoise on their heads as a symbol of calm. On this hexagonal chariot was a large head of an elephant, in which was the cave of the god of sleep, surrounded by his sons Morpheus, Icelus and Phantasos. Above the cave, Alba, the dawn, was reenacted with dew-wet blond hair. A personification of night was positioned in front of the imaginary house of sleep, leaning on a badger and probably using the animal as a cushion. Beneath the night was a satyr seated on a boar's head as an Orphic symbol of the dream considered proper to both men and gods. The various sections of the scene are separated by witches, nocturnal animals, satyrs and putti wearing garlands of poppies. The back of the chariot featured a depiction of the mythological event of Luna and Endymion. 802) The downright Petrarchan view of life – a life that resembles a (short) dream (803), since »wealth, beauty, war, fame and even love [...] [are] nothing but figments of the imagination to which man pursues in vain« (804) - contributed to the great excitement of the procession. (805)
The author presents some pictures related to the "dream theme" at the end of the text.

Image


A "dream" picture of Vasari 1566-70. Vasari wrote a description of the Trionfi de Sogni in 1566. At the pages 342-347 of the following work:

Delle vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori, et architetti
by Giorgio Vasari
per gli eredi di Evangelista Dozza., 1647 - 407 pages
https://books.google.de/books?id=dVS_w6 ... ni&f=false
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

8
About 11 years ago (2011) I started this thread "Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods" with ...
Trionfo de Sogni 1566
-------------------------
This is intended to collect some material to the Trionfo de Sogni (Triumph of dreams) for a marriage in 1565/66 in Florence.
The central star is the Demogorgon, something like a Demiurg or a God-generation-monster.
Image
Image
http://books.google.com/books?id=yVnuNJNJ7icC&pg=PA22
Marcos Mendez Filesi in his reply wrote then a longer article about Boccaccio and and his invention of the Demogorgon. This was the 3rd post in this thread ...
viewtopic.php?p=10630#p10630

I made recently some studies about Boccaccio ...

1. Parts of viewtopic.php?p=25583#p25583 in the thread title "Trionfi.com .... Petrarca links"
Demogorgon and Boccaccio

https://www.sueddeutsche.de/leben/dem-g ... -1.4678228
automatic translation .... https://www-sueddeutsche-de.translate.g ... r_pto=wapp

https://library.oapen.org/bitstream/han ... sequence=1
Paolo Cherchi: The Inventors of Things in Boccaccio’s De genealogia deorum gentilium ... page 244
Giuseppe Mazzotta: Boccaccio’s Critique of Petrarch .... page 270
The second text (Mazzotta) contains also the word "Trionfi"
After evoking Eternity and Nature, Boccaccio turns to the phantasmagoria of the natural sequence of created beings. From the Earth – the eighth of the nine daughters of Demogorgon – are born five children, among whom is Fama, love, death (Erebus), and time. It is difficult to resist recalling the ordered, progressive, hierarchical ascent of Petrarch’s Trionfi (love, time, fame, death, and Eternity), which Boccaccio dismantles. The neat rank ordering is displaced, and with it, Petrarch’s luminous self-consciousness plunges into the opacity of the mythology of Demogorgon who transcends all order and all individualities.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demogorgon
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodontius
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_of_Perugia
Pronapides the Athenian ....
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/tex ... ides-bio-1
https://topostext.org/people/10138

*************************

Added:
We had the Demogorgon earlier, in 2011, in context of "Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods"
search.php?keywords=demogorgon

MikeH recently directed me to the "Amorosa Visione", according Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amorosa_visione
...
Amorosa visione (1342, revised c. 1365) is a narrative poem by Boccaccio, full of echoes of the Divine Comedy and consisting of 50 canti in terza rima. It tells of a dream in which the poet sees, in sequence, the triumphs of Wisdom, Earthly Glory, Wealth, Love, all-destroying Fortune (and her servant Death), and thereby becomes worthy of the now heavenly love of Fiammetta. The triumphs include mythological, classical and contemporary medieval figures. Their moral, cultural and historical architecture was without precedent, and led Petrarch to create his own Trionfi on the same model. Among contemporaries Giotto and Dante stand out, the latter being celebrated above any other artist, ancient or modern.
Italian wikipedia:
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amorosa_visione
automatic translation:
https://it-m-wikipedia-org.translate.go ... r_pto=wapp
A part of it ...
Plot

The protagonist, who has been struck by Cupid 's arrows of love for Fiammetta, falls asleep and dreams of wandering through deserted places when he meets a woman who invites him to follow him and leads him to a castle which has two doors , the one on the right it is small and narrow and leads to virtue , while the one on the left is large and wide and promises wealth and worldly glory.
Allowing himself to be persuaded by two young men, he chooses the widest door and goes through numerous rooms on whose walls are frescoed the triumphs of Wisdom , Glory, the Avars , Love , Fortune and a kind woman . Thus he convinces himself " that these well-earned are truly / those who put each one under the grip of vices " [2] and follows his guide so that it leads him to see things " glorious and eternal "
[3] .
First he sees a marble fountain on which stand out four caryatids symbolically representing the four cardinal virtues , three small statues of women, symbol of pure love, carnal love and venal love and three animal heads , a lion , a bull and a wolf symbolizing pride , lust and avarice .
He then enters a garden where graceful women stroll and he recognizes Fiammetta among them. The two walk away in a " loco (...) all alone " [4] but when he tries to possess the desired woman, the dream vanishes. Awakened, he thus finds himself next to the guide who scolds him and tells him that he will be able to achieve what he desires only by following virtue and leaving worldly goods.
The poem ends with an invocation to the beloved woman to be compassionate towards him : [5] .

"Therefore, kind and valiant woman,
of beauty as a source of sunlight,
look at the flame that hides
inside my chest, and extinguish it
by being pitying towards me"
The descriptions contradict each other. Another Italian wikipedia page ... https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opere_del ... _Boccaccio ...
has another description, which present as automatic translation:
It is a poem in tercets divided into fifty cantos.
The actual narration is preceded by a proem consisting of three sonnets which, taken together, form an immense acrostic in the sense that they are composed of words whose letters (vowels and consonants) correspond in an orderly and progressive manner to the respective initial letters of each tercet of the poem.

The story describes the dreamlike experience of Boccaccio who, under the guidance of a kind woman, arrives at a castle, on whose walls allegorical scenes are represented featuring illustrious characters from the past. In more detail, the triumphs of Wisdom, Glory, Love and Wealth are represented in one room, and that of Fortune in the other.
It is inevitable to point out clear affinities and non-latent influence with the almost contemporary "Triumphs" of Petrarch.
Furthermore, the precise description of the frescoes has allowed some critics to identify the Boccacciano castle with Castel Nuovo in Naples, frescoed by Giotto. After having dwelt with display of erudition on the beauties of the frescoes, Boccaccio passes into a garden where he meets Madonna Fiammetta and tries to abuse her in her sleep.

The timely awakening of the woman and the fact that she reminds the poet of the danger of the imminent return of her guide prevent the act from taking place. In fact, shortly thereafter the "gentle woman" returns stating that the poet will be able to achieve full possession of her beloved by leading a life marked by the virtuous precepts whose learning had been the essential purpose of the journey.

The work owes several debts to Dante and the Divine Comedy, especially as regards the experience of the "Visio in somnis" and the guidance of a "gentle woman", but the strong tendency towards emancipation of Boccaccio should also be underlined : while Dante follows in all respects the dictates of Beatrice, Boccaccio in numerous cases rebels against the patronage of the guide, for example in preferring the wide road of worldliness, with its fatuous attractions to the narrow and impervious one that leads to virtue. The sublime tone contrasts with the comedy of certain situations (primarily the meeting with Fiammetta) so that some critics have thought of a parodic intent on the part of Boccaccio towards the didactic allegorical poem.
Castle Novove Naples
Image

******************

Part 2 .... Selection ... I make a selection of the part 1 above in the attempt to focus the 5 objects, which somehow are presented as "5 Trionfi of Boccaccio"

I quote ... related to the 1st book of Genealogia deorum gentilium 1350–1367
Giuseppe Mazzotta: Boccaccio’s Critique of Petrarch .... page 270
The second text (Mazzotta) contains also the word "Trionfi"
After evoking Eternity and Nature, Boccaccio turns to the phantasmagoria of the natural sequence of created beings. From the Earth – the eighth of the nine daughters of Demogorgon – are born five children, among whom is Fama, love, death (Erebus), and time. It is difficult to resist recalling the ordered, progressive, hierarchical ascent of Petrarch’s Trionfi (love, time, fame, death, and Eternity), which Boccaccio dismantles. The neat rank ordering is displaced, and with it, Petrarch’s luminous self-consciousness plunges into the opacity of the mythology of Demogorgon who transcends all order and all individualities.
The wiki article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amorosa_visione has ...
Amorosa visione (1342, revised c. 1365) is a narrative poem by Boccaccio, full of echoes of the Divine Comedy and consisting of 50 canti in terza rima. It tells of a dream in which the poet sees, in sequence, the triumphs of Wisdom, Earthly Glory, Wealth, Love, all-destroying Fortune (and her servant Death), and thereby becomes worthy of the now heavenly love of Fiammetta. The triumphs include mythological, classical and contemporary medieval figures. Their moral, cultural and historical architecture was without precedent, and led Petrarch to create his own Trionfi on the same model. Among contemporaries Giotto and Dante stand out, the latter being celebrated above any other artist, ancient or modern.
Italian Wiki https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amorosa_visione translated has
Allowing himself to be persuaded by two young men, he chooses the widest door and goes through numerous rooms on whose walls are frescoed the triumphs of Wisdom , Glory, the Avars , Love , Fortune and a kind woman
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opere_del ... _Boccaccio translated has ....
In more detail, the triumphs of Wisdom, Glory, Love and Wealth are represented in one room, and that of Fortune in the other.
**************

Part 3 .... Conclusions

I personally think, that there is somehow a confusion, what the 5 Trionfi of Boccaccio precisely were.

The description of the Trionfi de Sogni knows also a group of 5 objects:

German dissertation
Im vorderen Bereich des durch mehrere Darsteller inszenierten nächtlichen Zuges befanden sich Figuren, die die menschlichen Begierden symbolisierten, wie Liebe, Schönheit, Ruhm und Reichtum, und die als »trügerische Begierden wie Träume« (800) verstanden werden sollten. [here it are only 4 objects]
and
Der geradezu petrarkistische Blick auf das Leben –ein Leben, das einem (kurzen) Traum ähnele, da »Reichtum, Schönheit, Krieg, Ruhm und sogar die Liebe [...] nichts als Phantasiegebilde [seien], denen der Mensch vergeblich nachjagt« – trug zum großen Aufsehen des Zuges bei.
[here it are 5 objects]

In the English translation ...
In the front area of the nocturnal procession, staged by several actors, were figures that symbolized human desires, such as love, beauty, fame and fortune, and as » deceptive desires like dreams” should be understood.

The almost Petrarchan view of life – a life that resembles a (brief) dream, since »wealth, beauty, war, fame and even love [...] nothing but fantasies that man chases in vain« – contributed to the great sensation of the procession.
At the "content" page of the anonymous writer, which I already presented above, we find 5 relevant words ...
Image



Amor, Fama , Narciso, E Bellona,e richezza in van sentiero ... I'm puzzled, why the book printer started the word richezza with a small letter "r" and not with a big letter like A, F, N, B.

The sentence means translated: "Love, Fame, Narcissus, And Bellona, and wealth in vain path".
It appears in this work ...
https://www.jstor.org/stable/2544012 .... Naldini's Allegory of Dreams in the Studiolo of Francesco de'`Medici

This is the full text
HOR che la rugiadosa
Alba, la Rondinella à pianger chia
ma:
Questi che tanto v'ama,
SONNO, gran padre nostro e
dell' ombrosa
Notte figlio, pietosa
E sacra schiera noi
Di SOGNI, ò belle Donne, mostra à voi.

Perche'l folle pensiero
Human si scorga, che seguendo fiso
Amor, Fama, Narciso, E Bellona,e riccheza il van sentiero
La Notte, e'l giorno intero
S'aggira, al fine insieme
Per frutto à la Pazia, del suo bel seme.

Accorte or dunque, il vostro
Tempo miglior spendete in ciò che chiede
Natura, e non mai fede
Aggiate à l'Arte, che quasi aspro mostro
Cinto di perle e d'ostro
Dolce v' inuita, e pure
Son le promesse Sogni e Larve scure.

automatic translation to English

HOR that the dewy
Alba, the Rondinella is crying
but:
This one who loves you so much,
SLEEP, our great father and
of the shady
Night son, pitiful
And sacred host we
Of DREAMS, O beautiful Women, show to you.

Why the crazy thought
Human can be seen, that following fiso
Love, Fame, Narcissus, And Bellona, and riches the path in vain
Night is the whole day
It wanders, in the end together
For fruit à la Pazia, of her beautiful seed.

Be careful now, yours
Best time spend in what asks
Nature, and never faith
Aggiate à l'Arte, what an almost harsh monster
Surrounded by pearls and ostro
Dolce inuita you, and pure
They are the promises Dreams and dark larvae.
*********************

"Love, Fame, Narcissus, And Bellona, and wealth in vain path".
It appears in this work ... https://www.jstor.org/stable/2544012 .... Naldini's Allegory of Dreams in the Studiolo of Francesco de'`Medici

A picture with the name "Allegoria del Sogno", painted by Giovanni Battista Naldini c1571

Image


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosimo_I_ ... of_Tuscany ... had a lot of catastrophes in the 1560s in his family
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco ... of_Tuscany ... son of Cosimo, married 1565
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joanna_of ... of_Tuscany ... was married in 1565
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pietro_Carnesecchi ... was imprisoned in 1565 and killed a year later
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Vasari ... was involved in the Trionfo de Sogni and reported about it
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Battista_Naldini ... helped Vasari

The theme will proceed in the next post.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfo de Sogni 1566 - 21 Trionfi with gods

9
4. Vasari text

I detected something, which looks like a translation of the Vasari text to the Trionfo de Sogni .... It's a part of ...
http://www.travelingintuscany.com/art/g ... ives10.htm

Vasari's Italian text was here ...
https://books.google.de/books?id=dVS_w6 ... ni&f=false
OF THE TRIUMPH OF DREAMS AND OTHER FESTIVITIES. Now after this, although every square and every street, as has been told, resounded with music and song, merriment and festivity, our magnanimous Lords, distributing everything most prudently, to the end that excessive abundance might not produce excessive satiety, had ordained that one of the principal festivals should be performed on each Sunday, and for this reason, and for the greater convenience of the spectators, they had caused the sides of the most beautiful squares of S. Croce and S. Maria Novella to be furnished after the likeness of a theatre, with very strong and very capacious tribunes. And since within these there were held games, in which the young noblemen played a greater part by their exercises than did our craftsmen by attiring them, I shall treat of them briefly, saying that on one occasion there was presented therein by our most liberal Lords, with six companies of most elegant cavaliers, eight to a company, the play of the canes and the carousel, so celebrated among the Spaniards, each of the companies, which were all resplendent in cloth of gold and silver, ..... etc.
Added later: I first copied a larger part of text, but then I found a more comfortable version of the text later here:

Giogio Vasari: Of the Triumph of Dreams and Other Festivities (English translation, starts at page 117)
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33203/3 ... 3203-h.htm
... anI combined it with the Italian version
Giorgio Vasari: Del Trionfi de Sogni & d'altre feste (Italian original)
https://books.google.de/books?id=dVS_w6 ... ni&f=false

Later again I realized, that a lot of the text "before page 117" was also related to the wedding celebrations n 1565/66.

***********************

5. Part .. 21Trionfi with gods

I had written ...
...
I made recently some studies about Boccaccio ... [/quote]

Francesco I de' Medici married Joanna of Austria at 18 of December 1565.
The festivity of 2nd of February 1566 (according modern counting)
The festivity of 21st of February 1566 (accordung modern counting)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincenzo_Borghini
https://it-m-wikipedia-org.translate.go ... r_pto=wapp
...Italian wiki translated to English
https://de-m-wikipedia-org.translate.go ... r_pto=wapp
... German wiki translated to English

Borghini's Print Purchases from Giunti
by Eliana Carrara and Sharon Gregory (2000)
https://www.jstor.org/stable/41825884
also at https://www.academia.edu/988147/Borghin ... rom_Giunti

https://cicognara.org/catalogo/section_1.18
1375. BALDINI Baccio, Discorso sopra la mascherata della genealogia degl’iddei de’ gentili mandata fuori dall’Eccell. e Illustrissimo Duca di Firenze, e di Siena il giorno 22 Febbraio 1565 , Firenze 1565, presso i Giunti, in 8.
Questa è una delle meglio estese, e ordinate descrizioni d! spettacoli ricchi e grandiosi: libro raro e prezioso dal Poggiali attribuito a Buccio Baldini sull’asserzione di Paolo Mini scrittore contemporaneo e degno di fede.
MDXVI
https://www.maremagnum.com/libri-antich ... /161148064
https://archive.org/details/discorsosop ... 3/mode/2up ... presents the work of 1566

1378. MELLINI Domenico, Descrizione dell’apparato della commedia ed intermedi d’essa , recitata in Firenze il giorno di S. Stefano l’anno 1563 per le Nozze di D. Francesco Medici e della Regina Giovanna d’Austria, Firenze, Giunti, 1566, in 8. Aggiuntavi la descrizione dell’entrata della Regina Giovanna d’Austria e dell’apparato , scritta da Domenico Mellini, Firenze, Giunti, anno suddetto.
È indicato in fine di questo prezioso libretto come D. Vincenzo Borghini inventò l’apparato e segue nominando tutti i chiarissimi uomini di lettere e d’arti che vi furono impiegati.
MDLXVIII
Christina Strunck: Eine radikale Programmänderung im Palazzo Vecchio. Wie Michelangelos »Sieger« auf Giambologna und Vasari wirkte
https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/200258023.pdf
... contains material to a comedy, which was presented at 26th of December 1565 during the wedding festivities of Francesco I de' Medici with Giovanna d’Austria (page 263)
The link ...
https://archive.org/details/discorsosop ... 3/mode/2up
... allows a view on the content of the Trionfo of the 21 gods.
4 cantone at the begin (4 songs)
1 Demogorgone .... page 5
2 Cielo ... 18
3 Saturno ... 23
4 Sole ... 29
5 Giove ... 37
6 Marte ... 44
7 Venere ... 50
8 Mercurio ... 57
9 Luna ... 61
10 Minerva ... 65
11 Vulcano ... 73
12 Giunone ... 78
13 Nettunno ... 85
14 Oceano and Tethyde ... 90/98 printing error
15 Pan ... 101
16 Plutone & Proserpina ... 106
17 Cybele ... 112
18 Diana ... 114
19 Cerere ... 117
20 Bacco ... 120
21 Iano ... 123
page 133: Bartholemaei Panciatichi: Epigramma (some poems)
page 134 De triumphihis deorum, in Nuptiis. Francisci Medicis &Ioannae Austriacae (a poem for the wedding)
Baccio Baldini (c1536 - 1587)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baccio_Baldini

Theatre Festivals of the Medici, 1539-1637 ... recommended work
by Alois Maria Nagler
Yale University Press, 1964 - 190 Seiten
https://books.google.de/books?redir_esc ... ume&q=1566 .... only snippet view

Nicoletta Lepri: SPETTACOLO DELLA MEMORIA E MEMORIA DELLO SPETTACOLO. ARTE E MITO MEDICEO NELLE FESTE FIORENTINE DEL 1565* (2014)
https://lettres.sorbonne-universite.fr/ ... batdef.pdf

Image


Bartolomeo Panciatichi (he wrote the epigramms) by Angelo Bronzino
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Trionfo de Sogni 1566

10
The following is a German description of the wedding activities in Heinz Kindermann: Das Theaterpublikum der Renaissance, Band 1, Otto Müller Verlag Salzburg, 1984.

The bride arrived at 16th of December, 1565, in Florence. The city was decorated with triumphal arches, the connected festivities had many spectators.
The wedding took place at 18th of December.
The theater play "La Cofaneria" was presented at 25th of December in the Palazzo Vecchio.
https://books.google.de/books?id=_fV7T4 ... navlinks_s ... written by
The German text below describes mainly details of this part. An important role play the intermezzi, which are formed according the myth of Cupid and Psyche.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupid_and_Psyche

In February and March followed ...
a. the Trionfo de Sogni (2nd of February)
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33203/3 ... 3203-h.htm ... described by Vasari at page 117 ff.
b. a show of a victorious attack on a castle or another form of fortification
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33203/3 ... 3203-h.htm ... described by Vasari at page 126
c. the mascherata with the 21 chariots with gods (Genealogia degli Dei, 21st of February), Thursday before Carneval
d. 10 "mascherate delle bufole", at a "giorno di Carnovale"
https://it.wikisource.org/wiki/Le_dieci ... rata_Prima
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33203/3 ... 3203-h.htm ... described by Vasari at page 127 ff.
e. a Christian celebration with religious theatre around the annunciation scene in the church Santo Spirito

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



****************

Giorgio Vasari: Del Trionfi de Sogni & d'altre feste (Italian original)
https://books.google.de/books?id=dVS_w6 ... ni&f=false

Giorgio Vasari: Of the Triumph of Dreams and Other Festivities (English translation, starts at page 117)
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/33203/3 ... 3203-h.htm
Huck
http://trionfi.com