1617 French Parlament ... 1566 ... 1534 / Maria de Medici

#1
I've recently ...
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=754&start=45
referred to

Treize Livres des parlements de France, ès quels est amplement traité de leur origine et institution, et des présidents, conseillers, gens du roi, greffiers, secrétaires, huissiers et autres officiers
Bernard de La Roche-Flavin 1617
http://books.google.de/books?id=hrX42ey ... ts&f=false

and I added:
This seems of special interests, as it reports, that the French king Charles IX had prohibited Tarots (and some other game) at his court.
This seems to be wrong according new research. The French king referred to "hasard", but the author of 1617 preferred to interpret this more generally.

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I present the text of 1617 (a little more complete than for my first comment):

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For the ordonnance of 1566 I found this passage (which is not the original) ...
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k517005/f209.image

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In a global manner it is referred to ordonnances of earlier kings. In the same text of 1617 (page 610) I found the following (from 1534), which possibly was included in the global reference of 1566 (with possible other statements, which I didn't found):

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From general history it is known, that in 1617 the young king Louis XIII rebelled against his mother and "her Italian court". This was a major scandal with a murderous plot, an execution of the wife of the victim according the accusation, that she was a witch, and the king's mother had to leave the court at 2nd of May. She was ordered to take her residence in Blois.

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Leonora Dori
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonora_Dori
Concino Concini
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concino_Concini
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Wikipedia states in the Concini biography:
In 1617-1618, many rumours, fake news and pamphlets were distributed in Paris to justify Concini’s murder.
I can't say for the moment, if the remarks against Tarots in the text of 1617 refer in any way to the somewhat hectic developments in this year and the years, that followed:

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The Flight from Blois [this happened February 1619] is a depiction of Queen Marie escaping from confinement at Blois. The Queen stands in a dignified manner, suggesting her poise in times of disarray, amongst a chaotic crowd of handmaidens and soldiers. She is led and protected by a representation of France, and guided by illustrations of Night and Aurora. They are used literally to portray the actual time of the event and shield the queen from spectators as they illuminate her path. Rubens painted a scene of the event in a more heroic nature rather than showing the accuracy of realistic elements. According to historical records of the Queen's escape, this painting is not truthfully reflecting the moment of the occurrence. Rubens did not include many of the negative aspects of the event, fearing that he would offend the Queen, which resulted in the paintings non-realistic nature. The Queen Marie is depicted in a humble way, yet the illustration implies her power over the military. She does not express any hardships she had gone through by the escape. The male figures in foreground reaching for are unknown. The larger figures in the background represent the military, who were added to have a symbolic meaning of the Queen's belief in the command over military.


Interestingly the idea (just in 1621, 21 years after her wedding) was to present Maria de Medici's life and that of her husband Henry IV of Navarra in 24 pictures for each of them. Maria's cycle was finished ... 21 for her life and three portraits with her and her parents.
There was a similar idea for Henry IV (this cycle was not finished), at least this were also 24 pictures - as a project.

Well, it looks a little bit like a gigantic Tarot game. 21 figures for the show - 3 for the individual perspective. And the 21 for the great triumphs of her life have a sequence:
4.1 The Destiny of Marie de' Medici
4.2 The Birth of the Princess
4.3 Education of the Princess
4.4 The Presentation of Her Portrait to Henry IV
4.5 The Wedding by Proxy of Marie de' Medici to King Henry IV
4.6 The Disembarkation at Marseilles
4.7 The Meeting of Marie de' Medici and Henry IV at Lyons
4.8 The Birth of the Dauphin at Fontainebleau
4.9 The Consignment of the Regency
4.10 The Coronation in Saint-Denis
4.11 The Death of Henry IV and the Proclamation of the Regency
4.12 The Council of the Gods
4.13 The Regent Militant: The Victory at Jülich
4.14 The Exchange of the Princesses at the Spanish Border
4.15 The Felicity of the Regency of Marie de' Medici
4.16 Louis XIII Comes of Age
4.17 The Flight from Blois
4.18 The Negotiations at Angoulême
4.19 The Queen Opts for Security
4.20 Reconciliation of the Queen and her Son
4.21 The Triumph of Truth
4.22 The Portraits of The Queen's Parents
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_de%27_Medici_cycle

21 for herself, and 21 for her husband, which makes together 42.

In the greater perspective we see, that in c. 1660 the Minchiate Francesi got 42 motives - naturally in a much smaller format. And much later, c. 1800, the Petit Oracles des Dames again - 42 cards.

The Petit Oracles with participation of Juno and Jupiter:

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Well, later generations knew these pictures of Rubens.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

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