Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#481
Here is Fossati's note to Vita, chapter 35, "How he governed the cities of his realm," at the statement
But then, after he turned forty, he ceased coming into the city altogether, or to allow any of his close associates to come in. His wont was to leave the Castle of Porta Giovia and to travel directly to his other nearby residences.
(translation Ianziti, p. 53; by "into the city" he means not leaving the castle)

Text page 146, note page 190, note 1:
https://archive.org/details/p1arerumita ... 0/mode/2up

Filippo Maria spent most of the summer of 1424 away from Milan. On 14 June, he issued a document while still in Milan. The next day, 15 June, he was in Abbiategrasso, where he suspended civil court proceedings on account of the plague. 24 June, Abbiategrasso, he issued the document you quoted above, with the seven cities listed in order, Abbiategrasso, Monza, Cusago, Pavia, Novara, Galliate, Vigevano. On 6 July, he was in Vigevano, and wrote to the Podestà of Milan. 8 July still in Vigevano. 28 September, he is back in Abbiategrasso.

I do not have access to most of the primary or secondary sources Fossati cites here.

It seems like Bianca Maria must have been conceived in late June or early July, before he left for Vigevano.
Image

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#482
Vigevano and Abbiategrasso are very close, about 12 km. A single problem, that one has to cross a river, the Ticino. This is something, which I might go by foot in a day without big problems, though I've meanwhile an advanced age and the handicap of a once broken leg. With a horse or a chariot one could make Abbiategrasso-Vigevano and Vigevano-Abbiategrasso in one day - also without big problems. Filippo Maria with his walking problems likely would have taken a ship, as far this was possible.
Likely one should assume, that Filippo Maria in 1424 arranged for himself a corona life, reducing outside contacts to a minimum. When Carmagnola went to Abbiategrasso in November 1424 (precise date is not available) and demanded to speak with him, he refused (or was possibly just not present) to speak with him. Carmagnola made a scandal out of this condition and escaped to a zone, where the Visconti hadn't influence. Carlo Malatesta should have arrived as a prisoner in Abbiategrasso in August 1424. His understanding with Fillipo Maria should have been grandious (it is described in this manner), possibly cause Filippo Maria was in a splendid mood, as he had the relieving news, that Agnese was pregnant.
This good news possibly caused, that Filippo Maria gave the order to produce a card game with gods.
At least this is a possible hypothesis. For this he would have needed the presence of Marziano da Tortona.

Probably one should note in this context, that Filippo Maria and Milan had a trionfi festivity in summer 1425, likely in context of the birth of the daughter of Filippo Maria.

3 years later (after November 1424 and the Carmagnolo excitement) another Carlo Malatesta, younger relative of the older Filippo-friend Carlo Malatesta, became the leading army-general for Filippo (October 12, 1427). The result of the connected battle was a very disappointing event for Filippo Maria. The successful general on the other (Venetian) side was Carmagnola.
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battaglia_di_Maclodio
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#483
https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/p ... H.75.5.528
"In the 1424-30 period , 73 per cent of the plague deaths occurred in July, August or September, compared to less than 1 cent in January through March."
This sentence is related to the situation in Florence, not in Milan. But the situation of Filippo Maria at begin of the plague in Milan 1424 is similar: "at the beginning of the summer 1424 some cases of plague occurred in Milan and Filippo Maria Visconti immediately came to Abbiategrasso".
In Pavia 1423 the council stopped the activities very quick ...
"According to the terms of the Council of Constance calling for periodic ecumenical councils to discuss church policies, Pope Martin V convened a council at Pavia, which was hardly inaugurated on 23 April 1423, when plague broke out at Pavia and the council was hastily adjourned to Siena."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Council_of_Siena
Council of Siena (1423)
It was decreed in the Council of Constance that five years later another council should be called. In fact Martin V summoned it for Pavia, where it was inaugurated on 23 April, 1423. The general session had not yet begun when the pestilence broke out at Pavia, for which reason the transfer of the Council to Siena was decreed. The procedure of the Council was almost identical with that at Constance. Certain formalities of safe conduct issued by the city for the members of the Council were the cause of friction with the pope. On the eighth of November four decrees were published: against the Hussites and the Wyclifites; against those who continued the schism of Benedict XIII; on the postponement of the negotiation with the Greek schismatics, and on greater vigilance against heresy. Gallican proposals of reform were productive of discord with the French. On 19 February, 1424, Basle was selected as the place of the next Council. On 20 February the dissolution of the Council was decreed, but the Decree was not published until 7 March. The French would have preferred to continue the Council until the "reform" of the church "in capite et in membris" (in its head and its members) had been accomplished, but whether to avoid a new schism, or on account of fear of the pope (since Siena was too near the Papal States), they departed. The magistrates of Siena took care not to let anyone depart until he had paid his debts.


https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13779a.htm
The Catholic Historical Review 89.4 (2003) 770-77:
According to the decree Frequens of the Council of Constance, an ecumenical council was to be convoked by the pope five years following the end of Constance. Thus Pope Martin V in due time summoned a council to meet at Pavia, where a synod was inaugurated April 23, 1423. An outbreak of plague forced the sparsely-attended Council to move to Siena, where it lasted from July until its dissolution in March, 1424. Most of these months were filled with disputes over administrative matters, as well as divisions among the various nations; and the ambivalence of Pope Martin and his ultimate decision to remain away from the council made it difficult to get anything done. Despite the issuance of decrees on a number of issues, little in the way of reform was accomplished.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#484
Ross G. R. Caldwell wrote:
26 Aug 2020, 14:01
Marziano travelled more than Filippo Maria. He was in Genoa with his nephew Urbano in January 1422. I don't think Filippo Maria ever saw the sea. After that, everything with Marziano's signature or witness is from Milan, Pavia (April 1423), or Tortona (July 1424).
storiadimilano:
1421: 2 novembre - Assedio e conquista di Genova da parte dei milanesi guidati dal Carmagnola.
January 1422 is close to November 2 in 1421, something between 30-60 days. 70 km are between Genova and Tortona, possibly over difficult mountains, though not very high as it seems.
It seems, that Marziano had a lot of technical conferences there, how Milan could have some use for the splendid abilities of Genuese ships. Likely also about information of the Greek connections of Genova.

Tortona seems to be the closest Milanese city of some importance for the Genovese region. A competition might be Novi Ligure, which is closer. This has this history:
Novi was a free commune until 1157, when it fell to Tortona. It was handed over the marquis of Montferrat in 1223, returning briefly to Tortona in 1232–64. In 1353 Giovanni Visconti of Milan and Genoa conquered it. Novi was donated to the latter in 1392, but was occupied by the condottiero Facino Cane in 1409–12. In 1447, after the death of Filippo Maria Visconti, the governors of the city decided to free forever from Milan, and gave it to Genoa. Around this time, a feudal lord Galeazzo Cavanna was Signore di Castel Gazzo, a fortress on the edge of the town. However, the Sforza of Milan retained its possession until the defeat of Ludovico il Moro, when it passed to the French until Andrea Doria conquered the city for Genoa in 1529.
Tortona seems to be of more importance.
Perhaps the disappearance of Marziano at other places and going to Tortona (which means near to Genova) had reasons, which have to be searched in Genovese matters and not in the bad health of Marziano. Carmagnola in 1424 considered his stay in Genova as wasted time, but Filippo Maria possibly found it of big importance to have a strong general in Genova.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#485
Huck wrote:
27 Aug 2020, 09:17
Ross G. R. Caldwell wrote:
26 Aug 2020, 14:01
Marziano travelled more than Filippo Maria. He was in Genoa with his nephew Urbano in January 1422. I don't think Filippo Maria ever saw the sea. After that, everything with Marziano's signature or witness is from Milan, Pavia (April 1423), or Tortona (July 1424).
storiadimilano:
1421: 2 novembre - Assedio e conquista di Genova da parte dei milanesi guidati dal Carmagnola.
January 1422 is close to November 2 in 1421, something between 30-60 days. 70 km are between Genova and Tortona, possibly over difficult mountains, though not very high as it seems.
It seems, that Marziano had a lot of technical conferences there, how Milan could have some use for the splendid abilities of Genuese ships. Likely also about information of the Greek connections of Genova.
Marziano didn't stay long, he was back in Milan in early February. Filippo Maria appointed Urbano Rampini da Sant'Alosio to be governor of Genoa for two and a half months, 17 January to 31 March, 1422. https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogi_dell ... 1421-1435)

The following three entries for Marziano are sequential.
1421 19 November Abbiategrasso:

presentibus testibus Spectabilibus ac nobilibus viris dominis Martiano et Urbano de Sancto Alosio witnesses to: Ratification of a convention stipulated by Carmagnola on November 14, 1421 in the great hall of the Town Hall of Genoa with the Genoese citizens Giovanni Grillo, Antonio Doria, Carlo Lomellino, Raffaele Centurione, Cipriano Spinola, Montano de Mari and Lazzaro Vivaldi, who are obliged to pay in 18 months time to Tommaso di Campofregoso the sum of 30 thousand florins for the repurchase of the Castelletto di Genova and the other forts, a sum that will be returned by the Duke in sixteen and a half months time from December 1st, in the amount of money 34 ½ Genoese for each florin, i.e. a total of 51.750 Genoese pounds corresponding to 30 thousand florins. The aforesaid sum will be inscribed in the registers of the bank of S. Giorgio to the credit of the appointed gentlemen.

Registri ducali 27 (L alias M) folio lxxviiijr (77r);
Luigi Osio, Documeti diplomatici tratti dagli archivi milanesi, II, parte I, document LV, pp. 94-97;
Giacinto Romano, “Contributi alla storia della ricostituzione del ducato milanese sotto Filippo Maria Visconti (1412-1421),” Archivio Storico Lombardo, serie terza, volume VII, anno XXIV (1897), 67-146: no. DXIII, p. 146: Ratifica di una convenzione stipulata dal Carmagnola il 14 novembre 1421 nel gran sala del palazzo del Comune di Genova con i cittadini genovesi Giovanni Grillo, Antonio Doria, Carlo Lomellino, Raffaele Centurione, Cipriano Spinola, Montano de Mari e Lazzaro Vivaldi, i quali si obbligano a pagare fra 18 mesi a Tommaso di Campofregoso la somma di fiorini 30 mille per il ricurpero del Castelletto di Genova e degli altri fortilizi, somma che sarà restituita dal duca fra sedici mesi e mezzo a datare dal 1° dicembre prossimo, in ragione di soldi 34 ½ genovesi per ogni fiorino, vale a dire in tutto libbre genovesi 51,750 che corrispondono a fiorini 30 mille. La predetta somma sarà inscritta ne' registri del banco di S. Giorgio a credito de' nominati signori.
1422 20 January Genoa:

Praesentibus Magnifico domino Francisco de Vicecomitis dicto Carmagnola comite Castrinovi, Spectabilibusque viris dominis Martiano de Sancto Alosio ducali Secretario et Urbano de Sancto Alosio, collaterali generali, comissariis ducalibus in praedicta civitate Janue as witnesses to: twenty-four ambassadors representing the different factions from Genoa are appointed to go to Milan to make solemn dedication of the city to the Duke.

Registri ducali 31 (M n. 1 alias Z) folio 103v;
Felice Fossati, Petri Candidi Decembrii Opuscula historica, p. 324 lines 100-105: lo strumento 20 gennaio 1422 in cui è con Urbano di S. Alosio e col Bussone testimonio di nuovo in Genova alla nomina del 24 cittadini che dovrano presentarsi a Filippo Maria per consegnargli la città ecc., ma tutt'e tre son detti commissari ducali.
1422 14 February Milan:

domino Martiano de Sancto Alosio filio quondam domini Joannis (Marziano da Sant'Alosio son of the late lord Giovanni), Conradino de Vicomercato filio quondam domini Thomasii et Zaninio Zitio filio domini Stefani, secretariis prefati illustrissimi domini domini ducis witness to: Giovanni Covo on behalf of his brothers Pietro and Nicolò takes the Oath of Fealty as the only one invested with the fief of Covo.

Registri ducali 31 (M n. 1 alias Z) folio 133v;
Felice Fossati, Petri Candidi Decembrii Opuscula historica, p. 325 lines 35-37;
Francesco Galantino, Storia di Soncino con documenti III, p. 229: Giovanni Covo a nome anche dei fratelli Pietro e Nicolò presta giuramente quale unico investito del feudo di Covo;
Federica Cengarle, Feudi e feudatari del duca Filippo Maria Visconti, pp. 303-304, number 132.
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Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#486
I was wrong with "January 1422 is close to November 2 in 1421, something between 30-60 days", "something between 60-90 days" is correct.
Whatever Marziano and his nephew Urbano wanted in Genova, it wasn't holidays and should have had certain relations to the deep political change in Genova. Returning to peceful conditions needs some time, when a city has fallen.
For Tortona, a city between Genova and the big cities Pavia and Milan, the change likely meant an increasement of traffic and trade in the future. For instance stations to exchange horses.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#487
Huck wrote:
28 Aug 2020, 15:24
I was wrong with "January 1422 is close to November 2 in 1421, something between 30-60 days", "something between 60-90 days" is correct.
Whatever Marziano and his nephew Urbano wanted in Genova, it wasn't holidays and should have had certain relations to the deep political change in Genova. Returning to peceful conditions needs some time, when a city has fallen.
For Tortona, a city between Genova and the big cities Pavia and Milan, the change likely meant an increasement of traffic and trade in the future. For instance stations to exchange horses.
Urbano was governor, since 17 January. They were getting 24 citizens from the different districts and factions of the city to come up to Milan to swear fealty to the duke. Urbano was for some years already "collateral general" for Filippo Maria - he inspected the fortified cities on a regular basis, and paid the armed men stationed there. I don't know why Marziano specifically was there with him, beyond what he is called in the document, "secretary." Carmagnola was leaving from his duties for the moment, for a year at least.

I could speculate that Marziano was there because he was the uncle of Urbano, and maybe he had experience with the factions, like they already existed in Tortona. I think this was the only time Urbano was governor; it was a big, and dangerous, job in a city like that. The second reason might be that Marziano knew the "stilus cancellariae" (chancellery formula style) of the Visconti regime very well, and could compose the legal documents without any trouble. Clearly Filippo Maria trusted him fully.

But he did not stay long, since he was present in Milan on 14 February.

As far as I can tell, this document has not been published, so if you are interested in who these people were, or anything else, you'll have get the list of names from the original at the Archivio di Stato di Milano - http://www.asmilano.it/AriannaWeb/main. ... 8_archivio

Register 31, folios 100v to 103v (pages 183-188 in their viewer)

The second tab says "Immagini." If you cannot see the register, you must turn on or "allow" your Flash viewer. For me, this is at the top left of my screen, where it says "Not secure." Click on "Not secure" and you will get the option to use Flash or not. Allow it.

Then go to page 183 of the viewer.
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Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#488
German wiki to the Doges of Genova counts the Visconti time in Genova 1421-1425 like this ...
Unter der Herrschaft von Filippo Maria Visconti, Herzog von Mailand: 1421–1435
1421–1422: Francesco Bussone (= Carmagnola)
17. Januar(?) 1422–31. März 1422: Urbano di Sant'Alosio

5. Dezember 1422–1424: Francesco Bussone (= Carmagnola)
15. November 1424–1428: Giacomo degli Isolani, Kardinal
1428–1432: Bartolomeo Capra, Erzbischof von Mailand
1432–(?): Oldrado di Lampugnano
1434(?)–1435: Oppizino di Alzate
1432(?): Francesco Barbavara
25. Dezember 1435: Erasmo Trivulzio
Isnardo Guarco: 28. März 1436–3. April 1436
Carmagnola in November 1424 creates a hateful scene in Abbiategrasso, the precise date in this month is not known to me. The consequence of the action demands, that Carmamagnola has to to escape from Milanese territory as quick as possible. 15. November 1424 (see above) is given as start for the installment of Giacomo degli Isolani, Kardinal. Perhaps one can assume in this situation, that Giacomo degli Isolani was installed after the hatefull action of Carmagnola, but possible is also, that Carmagnola was in a rage cause Giacomo degli Isolani got his job.

Giacoma Isolani has a biography here, it doesn't explain the month November 1424
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giacomo_Isolani
https://www.wandruszka-genealogie.eu/An ... solani.pdf
This explains more, but I don't understand it completely. I translated a part with the translation automat:
1420 between the duke and Florence had assigned Bologna and the
Romagna to Florentine influence, in March 1422 the Visconti made an agreement with
papal legate in Bologna, in May 1423 he secured control of Forlì and in
June made Anton Galeazzo Bentivoglio, an emerging figure in Bologna, one of his
ally. The risk that the city was included in the Visconti domain became concrete e
Rinaldo degli Albizzi, Florentine ambassador to Bologna, gave worried notice
to his own government, citing as the source or, perhaps, as the inspiration of the Visconti designs
the., "provisioned" by the duke. However, the Duke's interest and resources were soon turned
to other objectives; therefore the threat on Bologna and also the commitment of the I. (= Isolani) it was
addressed to other purposes. Between July and October 1424 the I. he was at the Papal Curia in
occasion of a peace conference promoted by Martin V. At the preparatory talks,
interesting the clash between Florence and Milan, the I. (= Isolani) in robe,
it would seem, more as a collaborator of the pope than as a Visconti representative. But the
his bond with the duke had not ceased, so much so that in October 1424, when already
the failure of Martin V's initiative was looming, his assumption was taken for granted
to a high post in the Visconti administration. In fact, in early November,
relieved Francesco Bussone (Carmagnola) from the post of governor of Genoa,
in view of the command of a military expedition against the Kingdom of Naples, the Visconti
he appointed the I. (= Isolani) to succeed him, who on 15 November entered Genoa as governor
. TO
Genoa the latest events, culminating in the limited success of the expedition
against Naples of the Genoese fleet, entrusted by Visconti not to an admiral
Genoese but to Guido Torelli, they had rekindled the dissent towards the duke
from Milan.
"In fact, in early November,
relieved Francesco Bussone (Carmagnola) from the post of governor of Genoa,
in view of the command of a military expedition against the Kingdom of Naples, the Visconti
he appointed the I. (= Isolani) to succeed him, who on 15 November entered Genoa as governor

This sounds, as if Carmagnola had the condottieri commission to attack Naples.

English wiki (Bussone) tells:
"Soon the whole duchy was brought once more under Visconti's sway. But Filippo Maria, although he rewarded Carmagnola generously, feared that he might become a danger to himself, and instead of giving him further military commands made him governor of Genoa. Carmagnola felt greatly aggrieved, and failing to obtain a personal interview with the duke, threw up his commission and offered his services to the Venetians (1425)."
Similar it is interpreted by others.
If this is would be correct, then one should think, that Carmagnola was happy to get the job to attack Naples. But Carmagnola, as we know, isn't happy. There is a big contradiction.

Treccani.it has the clarifying information:
Per quanto se ne sappia il B., tuttavia, non protestò, e lasciata la carica di governatore partì da Genova il 5 ott. 1424, sicuro di assumere il comando di una nuova armata destinata alla Puglia. Ma la spedizione venne annullata un mese dopo. È senza dubbio leggenda il racconto del Biglia secondo il quale ad Abbiate il B. fu protagonista di una scena tempestosa quando il duca rifiutò di riceverlo; ma è certo, tuttavia, che egli si trovò allora senza una carica, senza un comando, tenuto lontano dal duca da persone della cui gelosa ostilità doveva essere ben conscio, e senza alcuna sicura prospettiva per il futuro.
Automatic translation:
As far as we know, the B., however, did not protest, and left the office of governor he left Genoa on 5 October. 1424, confident of taking command of a new army destined for Puglia. But the expedition was canceled a month later. Biglia's story is undoubtedly legendary, according to which B. was the protagonist of a stormy scene in Abbiate when the duke refused to receive him; but it is certain, nevertheless, that he found himself then without a position, without a command, kept away from the duke by people of whose jealous hostility he must have been well aware, and without any sure prospect for the future.
This description makes sense. Carmagnola simply was cheated with a promise, which wasn't fulfilled.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#489
Urbano di Sant Alosio 1380-1443 (nephew of Marziano)
http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/urb ... rafico%29/

We had ...
Urbano and Marziano visited Genova in January 1422, after Genova was conquered at November 2, 1421, by Carmagnola. Carmagnola became then Governor of Genova.
Urbano became then governor of Genova at January 17, 1422, and replaced Carmagnola.
Marziano was then in Milan at February 14.
Urbano was governor till March 3, 1422 (according German wiki)
... then it seems, that nobody is governor for a while ... (according German wiki)
Carmagnola becomes governor again ... December 5, 1422 ... (according German wiki)

Treccani.it has about Urbano ...
Soprattutto però egli diventò uno dei più apprezzati diplomatici al servizio del duca che lo impiegò in missioni particolarmente delicate. Fu il caso, ad esempio, della trattativa per la restituzione di Parma a Filippo Maria Visconti, che Urbano ricevette in nome di quest’ultimo il 16 novembre 1420 dal marchese Nicolò III d’Este, che l’aveva occupata negli anni della disgregazione dello Stato visconteo. Nominato luogotenente di Parma, vi si trattenne alcuni mesi per poi passare nell’Alessandrino e assumere il titolo di collaterale generale dell’Oltrepò, l’ufficiale incaricato di sovrintendere alle paghe delle milizie stipendiate. In questa veste Urbano partecipò attivamente alle trattative con i fuoriusciti genovesi e i signori delle Langhe e della Riviera di Ponente al fine di ottenere il loro aiuto nella guerra che il duca intendeva muovere al doge Tommaso Fregoso e al Comune di Genova. Quando questa scoppiò, nel maggio del 1421, egli fece parte dell’esercito che il Carmagnola condusse con successo nella Liguria occidentale e dopo la resa del doge (29 ottobre), fu destinato a suo assistente e controllore per tutto il tempo che gli fu consentito trattenersi a Genova. Quando poi il Carmagnola fu richiamato in Lombardia, egli assunse in via provvisoria il governo della città che mantenne dal 17 gennaio 1422 fino a che, nel marzo, non giunsero i governatori nominati dal duca. Alcuni mesi dopo, nell’autunno, venne incaricato di recarsi ad Asti per prendere in consegna quella città con il contado che il suo signore, il duca Carlo d’Orléans, nipote di Visconti e da sette anni prigioniero degli inglesi, aveva accettato di affidare provvisoriamente alla custodia dello zio fino a che non fosse riuscito a riottenere la libertà.
Automated translation:
Above all, however, he (= Urbano) became one of the most appreciated diplomats in the service of the duke who employed him in particularly delicate missions. This was the case, for example, of the negotiation for the return of Parma to Filippo Maria Visconti, which Urbano received in the latter's name on November 16, 1420 from the Marquis Nicolò III d'Este, who had occupied it during the years of the disintegration of the Viscount State. Appointed lieutenant of Parma, he stayed there for a few months before moving to Alessandria and assuming the title of general collateral of the Oltrepò, the officer in charge of overseeing the wages of the salaried militias. In this capacity Urbano actively participated in the negotiations with the Genoese exiles and the lords of the Langhe and the Riviera di Ponente in order to obtain their help in the war that the duke intended to wage against the Doge Tommaso Fregoso and the Municipality of Genoa. When this broke out, in May 1421, he was part of the army that Carmagnola led successfully in western Liguria and after the surrender of the doge (29 October), he was assigned to his assistant and controller for as long as he was allowed. stay in Genoa. When Carmagnola was then recalled to Lombardy, he temporarily took over the government of the city which he maintained from January 17, 1422 until the governors appointed by the duke arrived in March. A few months later, in the autumn, he was instructed to go to Asti to take over that city with the countryside that his lord, Duke Carlo d'Orléans, Visconti's nephew and a prisoner of the English for seven years, had agreed to entrust provisionally in custody of his uncle until he was able to regain his freedom.
Urbano had a lot of functions, and he was involved in the attack on Genova . It was not so, that Urbano and Marziano arrived as visitors in January 1422, but Urbano seems to have been there for a longer time and only Marziano was the visitor. In March other governors arrived and we don't know, who this were.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: What are the documents for Marziano's dates?

#490
Huck wrote:
30 Aug 2020, 09:57

Urbano had a lot of functions, and he was involved in the attack on Genova . It was not so, that Urbano and Marziano arrived as visitors in January 1422, but Urbano seems to have been there for a longer time and only Marziano was the visitor. In March other governors arrived and we don't know, who this were.
The wikipedia on Doges of Genoa says it was the "Rettorato del quattro Rettori," - which should mean "Rectorate of the four Rectors," sent directly by Filippo Maria Visconti. https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogi_dell ... 21-1435%29

It should be possible to find out who these were.
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